February 2020 Read: Less

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LESS,  Andrew Sean Greer, 2017. (261 pages)

 

A struggling novelist travels the world to avoid an awkward wedding in this hilarious Pulitzer Prize-winning novel full of “arresting lyricism and beauty” (New York Times Book Review).

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE

National Bestseller
A New York Times Notable Book of 2017

A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2017

A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten Book of 2017

Long listed for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence, the Lambda Award and the California Book Award
“I could not love LESS more.”–Ron Charles, Washington Post

“Andrew Sean Greer’s Less is excellent company. It’s no less than bedazzling, bewitching and be-wonderful.”–Christopher Buckley, New York Times Book Review

Who says you can’t run away from your problems? You are a failed novelist about to turn fifty. A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: your boyfriend of the past nine years is engaged to someone else. You can’t say yes–it would be too awkward–and you can’t say no–it would look like defeat. On your desk are a series of invitations to half-baked literary events around the world…

A scintillating satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, a bittersweet romance of chances lost, by an author The New York Times has hailed as “inspired, lyrical,” “elegiac,” “ingenious,” as well as “too sappy by half,” Less shows a writer at the peak of his talents raising the curtain on our shared human comedy.

Also proposed:

The Friend: A Novel,  Sigrid Nunez, 2018  (212 pages)

The Nickel Boys: A Novel,   Colson Whitehead, 2019 (224 Pages)

November 14 Bookclub

Shirley has delayed her renovations to bring us a delectable dinner. She will be serving shrimp and polenta with a green veggie. Please let us know if you can come and what delightful drink or libation you will be supplying.

January 2020 Book

My Sister, the Serial Killer: A Novel
NOMINATED FOR THE 2019 BOOKER PRIZE
WINNER OF THE LA TIMES BOOK PRIZE FOR MYSTERY/THRILLER
FINALIST FOR THE 2019 WOMEN’S PRIZE

Korede’s sister Ayoola is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola’s third boyfriend in a row is dead, stabbed through the heart with Ayoola’s knife. Korede’s practicality is the sisters’ saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood (bleach, bleach, and more bleach), the best way to move a body (wrap it in sheets like a mummy), and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures to Instagram when she should be mourning her “missing” boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit.

Korede has long been in love with a kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where she works. She dreams of the day when he will realize that she’s exactly what he needs. But when he asks Korede for Ayoola’s phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and how far she’s willing to go to protect her.

 

Other Suggestions:

“The Girl Who Lived Twice” by David Lagercrantz

“The Liar” by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen

9/12 Book Club -Ann Dielan

Ann is hosting our September meeting and will be dishing up shrimp and orzo. Please leave a comment below to let us know if you can come and what you will bring.

**Also please note you will need to park in the driveway that comes off Wynwood.

November Book Read -The Library Book

The Library Book. Susan Orleans
Susan Orlean’s bestseller and New York Times Notable Book is “a sheer delight…as rich in insight and as varied as the treasures contained on the shelves in any local library” (USA TODAY)—a dazzling love letter to a beloved institution and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries. “Everybody who loves books should check out The Library Book” (The Washington Post).

On the morning of April 28, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. The fire was disastrous: it reached two thousand degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a “delightful…reflection on the past, present, and future of libraries in America” (New York magazine) that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In the “exquisitely written, consistently entertaining” (The New York Times) The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries; brings each department of the library to vivid life; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.

“A book lover’s dream…an ambitiously researched, elegantly written book that serves as a portal into a place of history, drama, culture, and stories” (Star Tribune, Minneapolis), Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country.

There There. A novel by Tommy Orange. 2018.
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. Yuval Noah Harari