February Meeting

Katherine is hosting us this Thursday at 6:30.

No Spotted Dick or eggless pudding, we will dine without the limitation of ration stamps. Katherine is cooking up a beef tender and Shirley will bring an onion casserole.

Please leave a comment below to let us know if you can come and what you will bring.

Thanks also to everyone who has volunteered to host:
March -OPEN
April -OPEN
May -Bonnie
June 12 -Kathy H
July 10 -Kim Oh
August -OPEN
September -Audrey
October -Kim H
November -Shirley
December -June

If you want to sign up for a month that is not taken please add that as well in the comments below.

May Read Selected!

The votes are in and our May read will “The Goldfinch”. See below for other suggestions from Linda.

gold

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt From Linda: my favorite novel in years, but it is certainly not a quick read with some 800 pages. Still, it grabs you and won’t let go until you finish.

Per Amazon: The Goldfinch is a rarity that comes along perhaps half a dozen times per decade, a smartly written literary novel that connects with the heart as well as the mind….Donna Tartt has delivered an extraordinary work of fiction.”–Stephen King, The New York Times Book Review

Composed with the skills of a master, The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity.

It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a thirteen-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don’t know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

As an adult, Theo moves silkily between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty labyrinth of an antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love-and at the center of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle.

The Goldfinch is a novel of shocking narrative of energy and power. It combines unforgettably vivid characters, mesmerizing language, and breathtaking suspense, while plumbing with a philosopher’s calm the deepest mysteries of love, identity, and art. It is a beautiful, st

ay-up-all-night and tell-all-your-friends triumph, an old-fashioned story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the ruthless machinations of fate.

david

David and Goliath, by Malcolm Gladwell.  The #1 bestselling author of The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, and What the Dog Saw, offers his most provocative—and dazzling—book yet. (non-fiction)

From Linda: As a parent of a son with Dyslexia, the chapter that looked at the successes of those with that learning handicap made me realize what an advantage this was in teaching my son, Jon, to be dogged in his determination and to be able to see things in new ways. So many other seeming disabilities can really be powerful teachers in disguise, but what makes the difference.

This is a quick, fascinating read.

Per Amazon: Three thousand years ago on a battlefield in ancient Palestine, a shepherd boy felled a mighty warrior with nothing more than a stone and a sling, and ever since then the names of David and Goliath have stood for battles between underdogs and giants. David’s victory was improbable and miraculous. He shouldn’t have won. Mr. Gladstone goes on to explore many instances where the presumed underdog actually has the advantage.

sue monk

The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd.  From Linda: I just finished this one, and it is quite captivating. I include it because of its popularity and acclaim, and because it offers a different viewpoint of the American slaves and their masters.

From the celebrated author of The Secret Life of Bees, a magnificent novel about two unforgettable American women, one a slave and one her master’s daughter.

Per Amazon: Writing at the height of her narrative and imaginative gifts, Sue Monk Kidd presents a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world—and it is now the newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection.

Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love.

As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements.

Inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke, Kidd goes beyond the record to flesh out the rich interior lives of all of her characters, both real and invented, including Handful’s cunning mother, Charlotte, who courts danger in her search for something more.

Vote for the April Pick

Kim H. is offering up 2 great options for our April read. Reply to the poll below to vote for your preference.

download

We are Water, by Wally Lamb. From the New York Times bestselling author of The Hour I First Believed and I Know This Much Is True, a disquieting and ultimately uplifting novel about a marriage, a family, and human resilience in the face of tragedyAfter 27 years of marriage and three children, Anna Oh—wife, mother, outsider artist—has fallen in love with Viveca, the wealthy Manhattan art dealer who orchestrated her success. They plan to wed in the Oh family’s hometown of Three Rivers in Connecticut. But the wedding provokes some very mixed reactions and opens a Pandora’s Box of toxic secrets—dark and painful truths that have festered below the surface of the Ohs’ lives. Has received a lot of critical acclaim. Easy to read.

me before you

Me Before You, Jojo Moyes.

New York Times bestseller—with more than one million copies sold—by the author of One Plus One and The Girl You Left Behind They had nothing in common until love gave them everything to lose . . .Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has barely been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex–Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel—and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is.Will is acerbic, moody, bossy—but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.
A Love Story for this generation, Me Before You brings to life two people who couldn’t have less in common—a heartbreakingly romantic novel that asks, What do you do when making the person you love happy also means breaking your own heart